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Making a statement 

Dylan has his EHCP meeting on Friday and in preparation for this we have had to complete a form outlining Dylans wishes and plans; like it makes a blind bit of difference.

I’m struggling to hide my pessimism with the whole process but we’ve done as we’ve been told and Dylan’s SEN office had this landed in her inbox this morning.

Section A 

ALL ABOUT 

Things I’m good at (written by Mum and Dad)

Dylan is good at football and basketball. He is good a riding a bike and hanging out washing. He makes a great cup of tea and is incredibly honest.

Things I like, things I don’t like and new things I’d like to try (written by Mum and Dad)

Dylan loves food, mostly fast food such a McDonalds but he also loves a curry, pasta and any good gravy dinner with meat and two veg. He likes his food heavily seasoned with salt and pepper. He likes to drink cola and hot chocolate (but not together) He doesn’t like milk, cheese, butter or sandwiches unless it’s a marmite sandwich (with no butter).

Non-food likes – Dylan’s likes to swath himself in blankets and ensures that he has his head covered. He adores bathing and will spend many hours in bubbly baths. He likes to play games on the iPad or watch a range of kids TV shows including Roary the racing car, Paw patrol and SpongeBob square pants amongst many others. He enjoys water activities including swimming, watering plants and washing windows.

Non-food dislikes – Dylan hates the noise of handriers, motorbikes and loud unexpected noises. He is very unsure of toddlers, babies and puppies, usually because of the unpredictability and volume of their noises. Dylan isn’t keen on getting up in the morning and can take a long time to be coerced out of bed.

Dylan is keen on trying most things once it has been explained to him. He has recently been rock-climbing although he was nervous of this at first. Dylan has also recently tried yoga and this is becoming more bearable as he is getting used to what is expected of him.

Things I admire about me (Written by Mum and Dad)

Dylan knows he is fast when using his IPad as he is told this often,  

 Things other people admire about me  (Written by Mum and Dad)

Dylan listens to instructions well and tries to please people around him. He will always share with other people.

What’s working well, what’s not working so well and what I’d like to change



Dylan works hard at learning; he has less anxiety since leaving school. Dylan is attending more social groups which exacerbates his anxiety although this is improving with increased exposure. Dylan’s communication is improving hugely with the iPad and he likes that fact that he can increase his vocabulary independently with it. Dylan uses the IPad to communicate with a wider range of people which makes him happy.

Dylan doesn’t have enough exposure to mainstream peers of a similar age that can model appropriate behaviours for him and allow him to develop friendships.

Dylan isn’t given enough time to respond to people using his iPad; it requires a lot of education for the wider world to know how to communicate with Dylan’s iPad.

How I need to be supported to be heard and understood 
Dylan needs access to his IPad, fully charged at all times to be able to communicate his needs. Dylan requires 1:1 support at all times by an adult who is familiar with Dylan and his needs to ensure his safety with roads and strangers and to facilitate communication with others. When Dylan’s needs are not understood he can self-harm and internalise his frustrations, the trigger points of which can also be overlooked by those unfamiliar with Dylan and his needs.

The important people in my life; family, friends, favourite people (even pets)  

Name: Relationship:

Daddy Dad

Mum Mum

Josh Brother

Grace Sister

Hal Dog

Dylan’s story so far 

(Provided by Mum and Dad)



Dylan was born in 2003, a happy and healthy baby, did not develop speech and so was referred to SLT and had a diagnosis of autism by age 3. He attended an enrichment nursery place before moving on to MLD school age 4. Progress was non-existent and Dylan was bullied and frightened by the unpredictability and aggression of the other children in the school. Despite voicing concerns to the school about lack of progress and Dylan’s deteriorating mental health we eventually had no option but to remove Dylan from his school placement and to educate him at home.

Five years on Dylan has progressed although not enough to catch up with his peers but he is no longer is as anxious as he was previously. He enjoys his academic lessons and is progressing well at developing life skills.

Dylan’s aspirations and wishes e.g. education, play, health, friendship, further education, independent living, higher education, employment, family, next important steps

Dylan is very motivated by money and has expressed an interest in being employed when he is an adult. He would like to have friends and be able to play outside with his brother and sister.

Dylan’s family’s story

Dylan was our first child and was quickly followed by his younger brother and sister before he was diagnosed with autism age 3. Dylan’s education has been unsatisfactory with only the bare minimum being provided. The formal schooling system has felt to us as parents as glorified babysitting rather than him gaining any sort of education. We felt trapped and distressed by the lack of support with regards to Dylan’s inability to cope with the school place he was in and it was only as an absolute final straw that we took the plunge to remove him to try and make things better for him ourselves. Since then we have not had support or help from the local authority to educate Dylan despite repeated requests. Thankfully, due to our dedication and love for Dylan we have nurtured him back to being happy and responsive to learning. This has taken years to build and required a parent at home with Dylan full time which has had a knock on effect for the whole family financially. Dylan’s brother and sister Josh and Grace love Dylan very much, as he does them. 

Family’s aspirations and wishes for Dylan e.g. education, play, health, friendship, further education, independent living, higher education, employment, family, next important steps

We would like Dylan to develop a circle of friends and acquaintances. We would like him to be able to work in some capacity and earn his own money. We would like Dylan to be as independent as possible to manage his own health and to be able to keep himself as safe as possible. We will always have a place here with us if Dylan wishes to live with us forever. We want Dylan to be happy.

Summary of aspirations and wishes for Dylan (Long term hopes and dreams of the family or young person)


To be happy


 We’ll be seeing them Friday….
Photo courtesy of ‘A Very Special Needs Resource’  https://www.facebook.com/AVerySpecialNeedsResource/

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Tribunal, statements and now EHCP

Tribunal day was 18th January 2013. Fast forward 4 years after losing it but Dylan and his progress is still going strong. 

I received a call from the County Council today to start the ball rolling for Dylan to transfer to a EHCP. The EHCP -Education, Health and Care Plan- has been brought in nationally within the UK to replace the previously used ‘statement of special educational needs.’ 
We maintain Dylans statement of SEN as a warped safety net for if Dad and I are no longer able to continue ABA or home ed.
 There is no way Dylan would go back to a local school without me being very, very involved throughout. 

It is my experience the SEN education system is full of uncaring penny pinching fools. 

After attending tribunal to appeal the lack of support for Dylan being at home back in 2013 we waited 7-10 days to receive the news that we had lost and that the local school we had removed him from was deemed suitable, regardless of how far Dylan had progressed since leaving it. To lose after all that hard work of appealing was gutting to say the least, however we were aware that even if we had won we had an annual review booked in the following Feb. The education authority could have taken any provision gained at tribunal away, only 5 weeks after us winning it. 

The system is so messed up that they would have been well within their rights to do so and we would have had to endure the whole 12 month tribunal experience and expense to claw it back. 

A heartbreaking situation. Thankfully we decided to cut our losses and apply all of our focus where it mattered. On Dylan.

That was 4 years ago and I still feel a huge sense of injustice at the warped system of SEN assessment and provision. 

No other public funded service governes itself and has no one to answer to like the SEN system does. 

The reckless decision making and inadequate assessments are not permitted without justification – not in the NHS, not social care, not even regular education is run this way. But SEN teams make their own rules. They play their own merry tune and as a mere parent you have to dance to it. 

SEN teams can make life changing decisions about children and situations that they have never encountered and there is no one to question these decisions that have been made. 

Unless you go to tribunal.
 So £6000 later and potentially nothing gained. We had it confirmed; the system stinks, it’s corrupt and preys on the vulnerable. We burnt every last report, document and assessment. It was like therapy!

However since then I have happily reduced interaction with the education authorities as much as possible but the looming EHCP will not allow me such pleasure. 
The whole assessment process involves Dylan’s education being cut back to the bone and every little bit of progress and success being played down in an effort to confirm Dylans difficulties so that he can receive maybe part of any help that he needs. 
The prospect of selling my dear boy out to ensure the provision he needs is potentially safeguarded fills me with hate. 

Hate for the negative reports. Hate for the judgements. 

Hate for the whole system. 

It’s going to be a long couple of months.

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Summing up

In January 2013 we went to tribunal to fight for Dylan to be home educated using his ABA programme. We funded his programme ourselves and were appealing for the education authority to fund this while Dylan was not at school (there are no local ABA schools). We lost. That time; all the preparation, the assessments, the paperwork, endless photocopying, strict deadlines, various depressing academic scores and grades, heartbreaking details of failure and disabilty. It was relentless and took over our lives for the best part of a year. 

It was a couple of nights before the big day when I realised what all this work was for. All this work and effort was for the tribunal not for Dylan. All this work had no benefit to him at all but was to try and make a point to the tribunal bods. None of who we had ever met, we would never see again and who had little interest in Dylan as a person. 

In realising this I wrote the following in preparation for our ‘summing up’ at the end of tribunal once we had put our case of Dylans needs across to the panel. The sad truth is we didn’t even get to submit it or read it out. It was snowing on tribunal day and the panel wanted to get finished and go home to ensure they didn’t get caught up in the bad weather.  

Tribunal day for Dylan; a years worth of work and stress was over in 90 minutes.
********************************Summing up

Dylan is our son, we are his parents. 

In the last 18 months we have also become his teachers. 

This is not a role that we planned but we have done it and coupled with a suitably differentiated curriculum and a teaching methodology appropriate to his needs he is both improving and learning.

It is this progress that keeps us going. Dylan is able to learn when taught in a manner that recognises and supports his difficulties whilst promoting his emerging strengths. We are ensuring that Dylan receives a positive education.

This is not our job, it is the job of the Local Authority to at least support us with this but instead we are here, at tribunal, pleading for financial assistance for our sons education to continue with their support.

As parents the whole reassessment and tribunal process has been a steep learning curve albeit a valuable one. We have so much more knowledge about Dylan and his needs than before this process began.

The witnesses recognition of both Dylan’s communicative intent and possible academic ability and it being buried beneath his extensive sensory and communication difficulty has left us heartbroken – Our beautiful boy has always been in there and is trying to learn – it wasn’t until we began this process that we realised how much help he needed.

We have highlighted throughout the day how Dylan is improving and learning successfully. He is happier, less anxious and more receptive to learning compared to the previous four years. However, Dylan still has complex difficulties and remains severely behind the academic and social level of his peers.

The proposed provision from the Local Authority has previously been tried and tested for long enough leaving Dylan with his needs unmet and him failing to make adequate progress with his learning. Dylan’s last 18 months using his ABA programme has enabled him to access education and he is learning academically, socially and gaining self awareness. 

For these reasons it must continue.

Thank you for having us here today, to let us come and have a chance at protecting Dylan’s emerging learning ability.

Ultimately, he is our child and we as his parents have to do what he needs.

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This message still rings as true today as it did then.