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Best foot forward

Dylan went to the doctors today. Thankfully as a healthy child he doesn’t see the GP much. At all.
But recently I’ve noticed small bones protruding from just above the arches of his feet. The bumps are rubbing on his shoes resulting in him having small pressure sores developing. Dylan’s having to wear socks in the current stifling heat to avoid the skin there breaking down further. 

Although Dylan lets me look and check these lumps without complaining, his body language tells me it hurts. He flaps violently when he thinks they are going to be touched, his whole body stiffening with anxiety until he is reassured thst these sensitive areas won’t be meddled with.

We had no option but to visit the GP. We talked this through with Dylan who appeared to be okay and understand the basic process we were explaining to him. 

Appointment time came and went but Dylan was a superstar waiting patiently in the busy waiting room for his appointment. Finally we were called into the GP office Dylan kept his anxiety under control and allowed the doctor to look and feel the bony protrusions. I explained to the doctor they don’t look right and seem sore although Dylan’s communication difficulties make this really hard for him to relay to us.

‘Its all fine ‘

 doc said as if I was being a bit silly bringing my concerns. He went on…

‘We all have different feet, as long as he is exercising plenty he’ll be fine. 

Keep him moving”

That’s it. Consultation over. 4 minutes.

Dissatisfied with the advice from the GP we leave politely and get in the car so I can contact my default doctor for advice; 

Dr Google: search term “painful bump on side of foot”

First result of many all saying the same thing is this:

Seems Dylan is fitting the descriptor for a diagnosis of having Accessory Navicular Bone. 

Side effects of which are possible fractures, loss of stability of joints, development of ‘flat feet’, loss of mobility and pain which “gradually becomes worse, and… is aggravated by activity, walking, etc.” Resulting in Accessory Navucular Syndrome which can be debilitating and require a range of treatments.

Seems my inital discontent at the advice of ‘exercising plenty’ was not misplaced and indeed will not remedy this issue. 

I’m so mad! 

  1. Dylan has his diagnosis of autism in bold on his medical notes on the computer screen. 
  2. I told the doctor clearly that Dylan can’t tell us if he’s hurting. 
  3. We never go to the doctor but had presented for this ailment so it clearly is a concern and we were nothing short of fobbed off. 

First thing tomorrow; I’m self referring to a podiatrist for a proper examination for Dylan and some advice for me. Something I think I probably should have done in the first place. 

Grrr!

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Aside
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We’re all for trying new things, Dylan included. So when dinners involving a new item Dylan likes to check it before it’s dished up into his plate. Actually as soon as the serving spoons are out Dylan’s hovering around the kitchen checking out what’s going on.

Tonight’s dinner involved cous cous. Moroccan cous cous. Now Dylan likes rice and pasta and he certainly likes spice but in this combination. Not heard of before.

Dylan’s flapping around the kitchen so I get a small spoon and offer him some from the pan. Dylan sniffs everything before it goes into his mouth. Cous cous passes the sniff test and he goes in to take the while lot off the spoon. No gagging or grimacing Dylan swallows the lot. I go to put a spoon of it into his plate.

‘Non ‘ 

‘No? You don’t want any more?’ 

‘Non.  No danoo’  (No thankyou) shaking his head. 

‘Oh okay’ 

It’s no issue if he doesn’t want any. I’m just glad he tried it. Dylan’s still flapping in the kitchen. Then within ten seconds…

‘Yah bee’ pointing to the pan of food.

‘Yes? You want some?’

‘Yah bee’.

At home this perceived indecision isn’t a problem but it can take 5-10 seconds for Dylan to process the a relatively closed question and produce his correct answer. I think it’s his anxiety which is based on him knowing that an answer is expected which almost makes him knee jerk into a response be it correct or otherwise to avoid being wrong. Not having this delay acknowleged when out in public can result in Dylan’s verbal communication being futile and causing him further anxiety. Having the iPad as the first mode of communication when out produces more of a delay than when Dylan is speaking verbally. However if Dylan’s  speech is understood but its not his correct response then it can be problematic.

More so I’m understanding that complex communication issues and disordered speech sounds are Dylan’s greatest difficulties.

Oh and he ate the lot!

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Crash, mugum and other wonders 

Holidays are great for getting away from everyday life but also for spending non stop time with one another. Some families may not like this too much but as we hardly spend any time all together at home for us to be on holiday and have 24/7 in each others company is bliss!

Being away together also gives us time needed to fully embrace Dylan’s iPad use. He is supported to use it for every interaction both with us and new people. We can model words for him and add vocabulary to it as it’s required. 

In addition to this Dylan’s becoming proficient at adding his own words too. He can independently use the iPad to take a photo of an item or person that’s not in his vocab list and then use the drop down keyboard to type the word in. Dylan struggles with the spellings in this bit but is able to write enough for us to be able to understand and type the correct spelling for him. Self directed pictures and typing is a useful technique we are encouraging to enable Dylan to generate his own working vocabulary. This week already we have had

‘magum’ for Magnum icelolly 

‘hannk’ for hammock and 

‘crash’ for a computer game which he remembered both the location of and correct spelling for since our visit here last year.

This boy astounds me.

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Up, up and away 

Grace’s 10th birthday party was this week and she opted for a climbing theme. We arranged for seven giggling 9-10 year old girls with Josh and Dylan to all have 90 minutes on a climbing wall with an instructor.

Dylan appeared keen from the get go. He quickly grabbed himself a helmet when instructed but then the whole concept got a bit real and from that point on Dylan was a bit more apprehensive. 

When Dylan starts to get anxious he will whine and winge and usually sit out. He get frustrated and bored and will then require direct attention from a parent to ensure he is kept focused and behaviours don’t spiral for him. This isn’t bad behaviour but Dylan’s anxiety coupled with frustration at himself for being unable to complete the task. To most people they see “Dylan can’t do it; he needs to sit out.”

The party leader was relatively new so she was being supported by a more experienced instructor, lets call him Bill. On the registration form it requested any medical details for the children and for Dylan I added ‘autism -non verbal’.


Bill instinctively saw Dylans anxiety but also his wish to be involved. He showed Dylan the equipment and let him hold it before asking if he would like to wear it. He spoke directly to Dylan and copied the way I gave Dylan simple language and clear choices so Dylan could repeat his option back to me.  
Dylan will link onto my arm when we’re out and gradually through the party when he was ready to try a bit more equipment or to feel the wall a bit more,  Dylan started to unlink my arm and go and link arms with Bill.

Well. He only got on the flipping wall!! And more than once!!


Bill was so supportive and reassuring for Dylan. Once off the floor Dylan would panic, it looked like his correctly fitting groin harness was sending him into sensory overload and he wanted to get down now. Dylan would grab onto Bill’s hands and hold them tight but Bill took it fine. Some people recoil when Dylan tries to touch them. I suppose being an adolescent boy Dylan has some tactile needs that are closer to a boy younger in age; like the arm linking or hand holding and not everyone understands why Dylan does this. Bill didn’t care.  
Bill was cool.

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Lest we forget

Remembrance day. 

A time of reflection. Showing respect. An emotional for many remembering those loved and lost.

Grace took part in a local parade. The town was bustling with people young and old and with recent terror fears, police were out in droves to control the crowds and keep us safe. 

Dylan came along, pacified with a quick cup of hot chocolate at a local cafe before we headed out into the chilly November air.

We stood, we waited and we paid our respects. Dylan needed physical reminders to remain silent for the 2 minutes but we did it! 

Best yet!

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Ha-ha-happy Halloween!

Halloween. 

Not one of Dylans favourite celebrations probably due to the lack of preparation. The decorations go up that day and come down the same day. The costumes are uncomfortable and with it being a school/work day its usually all a bit rushed. 

The golden rules are broken and suddenly everyones out knocking on doors and taking sweets from strangers. 

I can see that it must appear bizarre and very unsettling.

So this year we did things a bit low key. Dylan wanted to dress up like the other two but instead of going out we drove them round to my mums for a hot chocolate and a handful of mini chocolates each.


And for the last day in October, and the final day of AAC awareness month, we set it up so that Dylan could treat us to some Halloween jokes.

Happy Halloween all 🙂