0

Christmas 2016.

It’s been a wonderful day on so many levels. We have been a family. We have looked after one another, focused on one another and been there to support and enjoy one another.  A real family Christmas, it’s been great. 

But it’s also been a time for reflection. Now this is not a sad post but one to remind of how fragile we all are, how every moment should be relished and enjoyed and how we should focus on what’s really important and not get lost in the smaller issues.

I’m holding my little ones close tonight when thinking of the international terror that’s been occurring in recent months. Feeling lucky that I am born where I am rather than a war-torn climate. I’m feeling thankful that I am loved and that both myself and my loved ones are healthy.

I am thankful for my steely determined views and that I am surrounded by people who believe in me, take a chance and allow me to act on my beliefs and hopes. 

I am reminded that this time last year things were so different. For Dylan theres been so much progress made, developments, friendships blossoming. But also in wider circles unexpected deaths, changes in health and some relationships shattered. We don’t know what’s around the corner; none of us do. That’s why it’s so important to live in the moment. Take a chance, right here and now and make it matter.

Wishing everyone a merry and peaceful Christmas  xxx

Advertisements
0

National Stress Awareness Day 2016

How can caring affect families?

When a child is diagnosed with a disability the amount of information and support offered to the family varies. Families can feel very alone and unsure about how to support their child, or what will happen in the future. Seeing challenging behaviour appear in a young child can be upsetting and confusing. There is a lot to learn and getting professional help and specialist services can be difficult.

Families are often socially isolated and can be left out of family events, activities and places in the local community because of their family member’s behaviour. Family carers say they have feelings like stress, frustration, anger, guilt, shame and loneliness, or feel that no-one understands what they are going through. Feeling low or stressed can sometimes lead to mental health problems like depression or anxiety, that need medical help. Relationships break down more often for people whose son or daughter’s behaviour challenges. Finding support and time alone to relax is really important, but can be hard. Meeting other parents is really helpful to get support and to share ideas of what has helped.

Eating well, exercising and getting enough sleep can be tough when your family member’s needs come first, especially if they have sleep problems. Families can plan their time to do activities that are good for all the family and be healthy together.

Parents might not be able to work and extra money is spent if things get broken or equipment and changes are needed at home. There are benefits, direct payments and grants that families might be entitled to.

Taken from the Challenging Behaviour Foundation Website http://www.challengingbehaviour.org.uk