0

Best foot forward

Dylan went to the doctors today. Thankfully as a healthy child he doesn’t see the GP much. At all.
But recently I’ve noticed small bones protruding from just above the arches of his feet. The bumps are rubbing on his shoes resulting in him having small pressure sores developing. Dylan’s having to wear socks in the current stifling heat to avoid the skin there breaking down further. 

Although Dylan lets me look and check these lumps without complaining, his body language tells me it hurts. He flaps violently when he thinks they are going to be touched, his whole body stiffening with anxiety until he is reassured thst these sensitive areas won’t be meddled with.

We had no option but to visit the GP. We talked this through with Dylan who appeared to be okay and understand the basic process we were explaining to him. 

Appointment time came and went but Dylan was a superstar waiting patiently in the busy waiting room for his appointment. Finally we were called into the GP office Dylan kept his anxiety under control and allowed the doctor to look and feel the bony protrusions. I explained to the doctor they don’t look right and seem sore although Dylan’s communication difficulties make this really hard for him to relay to us.

‘Its all fine ‘

 doc said as if I was being a bit silly bringing my concerns. He went on…

‘We all have different feet, as long as he is exercising plenty he’ll be fine. 

Keep him moving”

That’s it. Consultation over. 4 minutes.

Dissatisfied with the advice from the GP we leave politely and get in the car so I can contact my default doctor for advice; 

Dr Google: search term “painful bump on side of foot”

First result of many all saying the same thing is this:

Seems Dylan is fitting the descriptor for a diagnosis of having Accessory Navicular Bone. 

Side effects of which are possible fractures, loss of stability of joints, development of ‘flat feet’, loss of mobility and pain which “gradually becomes worse, and… is aggravated by activity, walking, etc.” Resulting in Accessory Navucular Syndrome which can be debilitating and require a range of treatments.

Seems my inital discontent at the advice of ‘exercising plenty’ was not misplaced and indeed will not remedy this issue. 

I’m so mad! 

  1. Dylan has his diagnosis of autism in bold on his medical notes on the computer screen. 
  2. I told the doctor clearly that Dylan can’t tell us if he’s hurting. 
  3. We never go to the doctor but had presented for this ailment so it clearly is a concern and we were nothing short of fobbed off. 

First thing tomorrow; I’m self referring to a podiatrist for a proper examination for Dylan and some advice for me. Something I think I probably should have done in the first place. 

Grrr!

Advertisements
Aside
0

We’re all for trying new things, Dylan included. So when dinners involving a new item Dylan likes to check it before it’s dished up into his plate. Actually as soon as the serving spoons are out Dylan’s hovering around the kitchen checking out what’s going on.

Tonight’s dinner involved cous cous. Moroccan cous cous. Now Dylan likes rice and pasta and he certainly likes spice but in this combination. Not heard of before. 

Dylan’s flapping around the kitchen so I get a small spoon and offer him some from the pan. Dylan sniffs everything before it goes into his mouth. Cous cous passes the sniff test and he goes in to take the while lot off the spoon. No gagging or grimacing Dylan swallows the lot. I go to put a spoon of it into his plate.

‘Non ‘ 

‘No? You don’t want any more?’ 

‘Non.  No danoo’  (No thankyou) shaking his head. 

‘Oh okay’ 

It’s no issue if he doesn’t want any. I’m just glad he tried it. Dylan’s still flapping in the kitchen. Then within ten seconds…

‘Yah bee’ pointing to the pan of food. 

‘Yes? You want some?’ 

‘Yah bee’.

At home this perceived indecision isn’t a problem but it can take 5-10 seconds for Dylan to process the a relatively closed question and produce his correct answer. I think it’s his anxiety which is based on him knowing that an answer is expected which almost makes him knee jerk into a response be it correct or otherwise to avoid being wrong. Not having this delay acknowleged when out in public can result in Dylan’s verbal communication being futile and causing him further anxiety. Having the iPad as the first mode of communication when out produces more of a delay than when Dylan is speaking verbally. However if Dylan’s  speech is understood but its not his correct response then it can be problematic. 

Mote so im undetstanding that complex communication issues and disordered speech sounds are Dylan’s greatest difficulties.

Oh and he ate the lot!

0

What’s in a day?

It’s Dylan’s birthday next Saturday. Since Joshuas birthday last week all talk has been preparing Dylan for it being his birthday next.

He has picked what presents he would like, what he would like to eat, which restaurant he would like to dine at. Hell, he’s even picked his birthday cake. We’re ready. 

Shame is that in all the preparations Dylan has overlooked the fact that it’s his birthday NEXT Saturday and not actually today. 

Dylan’s having none of this ‘we’ll do it next week’ business and is still sitting on his bed fully clothed with his coat and shoes on waiting to go out for his birthday dinner when it’s really late at night and he really should be ready for bed. 

Only another 7 days to go…

0

Feeling hot, hot, hot!

A scorching day today. 

Dylan continues to appear to have minimal awareness of how hot he is. He rarely sweats and insists that he sleeps with a thick blanket wrapped around him despite the temperature being 29 degrees overnight last night. 

Dylan is drinking plenty of water but is not requesting any independently and instead relies on us offering him sips literally every 15-20 minutes throughout the day. If he isn’t drinking little and often than he guzzles the water and it ends up making a reappearance leaving him at even greater risk of dehydration. 

We got up late this morning and all had breakfast together instead of mixing and matching between some of us eating and some swimming as we usually do. After eating its a rule that we make all children stay out of the pool for an hour to let digestion settle but today once the hour was up we were even further into the hottest part of day with the thermostat hitting a whopping 39 degrees celcius. 

We used the time together teaching Dylan how to play chase the joker. Dylan’s really good at recognising when he has a pair of matching cards and although he required assistance to take his turn and hold his cards correctly (fine motor difficulties again) he really seemed to tolerate the game. Josh and Grace were really kind and let Dylan pick the cards that he needed for the first couple of goes. 

By the time Dylan got into the swing of it he was winning independently! 

Playing cards is definitely a skill for us to practice and nurture for Dylan to access further age appropriate opportunities and social bonding.

0

Connecting

Sometimes nuggets of compassion from strangers catches you right in the feels. 

It could be a throwaway comment, a glance and a smile or a gentle nod of ‘I get you’ before the moment passes and the crossing of paths continue. 
Although few and far between these moments can give you a spur onwards when tiring from the ongoing effort of managing family life and the relentless need for continuity while offering encouragement during noisy, disruptive times when it can all feel a bit too much.

A look of support, a kind word or just ‘seeing us’  when out as a family can give us enough of a boost that sometimes we can feel supported without even interacting with anyone.

The truth is that the differences of having a child with disabilities to a family is immense and can make some of the most basic public tasks feel impossible. 
While away at the beach Dylan screamed, cackled and splashed, immersed in his deep deep joy of the sea and finding a common ground enjoying the warm water with his siblings.
 Josh came over to me on the waters edge and whispered to me “Mum, look; everyone’s looking” I turned to see everyone sitting upright on their lounges watching Dylans show. Josh and I smiled to each other as he rushed off to go back to play with his sister and noisy brother. 
Those watching may have been judging his behaviour or disapproving of the disruption to their quiet sunbathing but it felt to me as if they were enjoying watching them have fun as much as I was.

To those who spread little gestures of kindness, thankyou. Thankyou for recognising and spreading understanding for families like mine. 

Acceptance feels beautiful. Thankyou x